Finding heaven along South Carolina’s Highway 11

Seven state parks offer the best of fall for those seeking solace, color

Editor’s Note: An edited version of this story appeared in the September 2019 issue of South Carolina Living magazine.

By Michael Banks

Following a path traversed by the Cherokee and bordered by the Blue Ridge Mountains, South Carolina Highway 11 has become a favored route of those sightseers seeking solace and beauty. 

Seven South Carolina state parks straddle the approximate 120-mile long roadway — also known as the Cherokee Foothills Scenic Highway — and offer everything from hiking to fishing to boating.

With visitors flocking to the Upstate to view autumn’s colorful palate, here are some things not to miss and some tips on how to get the most out of your visit.

There are numerous paved campsites for RV and/or tent camping along the shores of Lake Hartwell near Fair Play, S.C.
(Photo courtesy of South Carolina State Parks)

Lake Hartwell State Park

Address: 19138 S. Highway 11, Fair Play, SC 29643

Contact: 864-972-3352

https://southcarolinaparks.com/lake-hartwell

Known for:

1. Outstanding fishing. The 56,000-acre Lake Hartwell is inhabited by striped and hybrid bass, largemouth, crappie, bream and catfish.

2. Camping. In addition to 115 paved campsites for RV or tent camping along the lake shore, the park is the only one in the state to offer unique, single-room camper cabins.

Insider tips:

Looking to combine a room with a view along with your college football? Well, Lake Hartwell State Park may be the option for you as the park sees a large number of people setting up camp on Saturdays in the fall.

“A lot of people come in for Clemson football games,” says Brooks Garrett, who has served as the Lake Hartwell park ranger for the past three years. “They’ll bring their campers in, stay for the weekend and go tailgating.”

He also suggested that birdwatchers visit Lake Hartwell during the week when the park is less crowded.

“We get a lot of migratory birds, especially warblers, during the fall,” he said.

A Civilian Conservation Corps monument at Oconee State Park in Mountain Rest, S.C., honors the 3-million plus people who served in the CCC between 1933 and 1942.
(Photo courtesy of South Carolina State Parks)

Oconee State Park

Address: 624 State Park Road, Mountain Rest, SC 29664

Contact: 864-638-5353

https://southcarolinaparks.com/oconee

Known for:

1. History. This park was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps and many of those structures can still be viewed. A CCC monument at the park honors the 3 million-plus people who served in the CCC between 1933 and 1942.

2. Wildlife. Black bear are sometimes seen and there is also a family of foxes who live at the park.

Insider tips:

Bring a good pair of closed-toe shoes and some energy and you’ll be rewarded with an awesome view of a 60-foot waterfall.

Assistant park ranger Savanna Kelley, who has been at Oconee for the past five years, says a three-hour hike along the Hidden Falls Trail is a perfect outing for the fall.

“You can see the waterfall more in the fall than any other month with the leaves down,” she said.

Kelley also suggested renting a paddleboat or canoe. 

“It’s gorgeous to take boats out on the lake with all the leaves changing,” she said.

As dusk falls, the colors of a late autumn sky make for a breath-taking display along the shores of Lake Jocassee in the Devils Fork State Park in Salem, S.C.
(Photo by Michael Banks)

Devils Fork State Park

Address: 161 Holcombe Circle, Salem, SC 29676

Contact: 864-944-2639

https://southcarolinaparks.com/devils-fork

Known for:

1. Lake Jocassee. Four mountain streams and several waterfalls feed into the 7,565-acre lake, making it cooler than others and one of the state’s top trout fishing spots, as well as a fave of anglers seeking bass and crappie. The park offers the only public access to the lake.

2. Scuba diving. The clean and clear waters of Lake Jocassee make it a favorite for divers. Swimmers also delight in the cool waters.

Insider tips:

Those looking for a unique study of leaf color can find it here, especially during the park’s peak viewing during the last two weeks of October and the first two weeks of November.

“Just get out on the lake and look at all the levels of color change,” said park ranger Kevin Evans, who has been the manager at Devils Fork for 12 years.

“To me, that’s one of the neatest parts. You can see the progression of fall by viewing the different elevations and the best way to do that is to get out on the lake itself.”

Evans also said Monday through Thursday is the best time to visit.

“You can have the entire lake to yourself. That’s just a great feeling, to have that feeling of being by yourself and that wonderment of really being immersed in the resource because there’s nobody else around.”

Keowee-Toxaway State Park in Sunset, S.C., offers access to the 18,500-acre Lake Keowee. It is a favorite of kayakers and canoeists, as well as fishermen.
(Photo courtesy of South Carolina State Parks)

Keowee-Toxaway State Park

Address: 108 Residence Drive, Sunset, SC 29685

Contact: 864-868-2605

https://southcarolinaparks.com/keowee-toxaway

Known for:

1. Lake Keowee. The 18,500-acre lake offers something for nearly every outdoor enthusiast surrounded by some of the most stunning views of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Those looking for an access point for their canoe or kayak should arrive early as there is a small parking lot.

2. Wildflowers are abundant at this state park, especially in the spring. Two rare species that can be found are Alleghany spurge and ginseng.

Insider tips:

One of the smaller state parks in the area, visitors should get out of their vehicles to experience Keowee-Toxaway.

“It’s a pretty park, but you really have to get out on the hiking trails as far as the views,” says park ranger Kevin Blanton, who has managed the 1,000-acre site for the past 12 years.

He suggests the No. 3 trailside camping site for those seeking a neat experience.

“It’s located out on a finger of land surrounded by Lake Keowee. To spend the night out on the point out by the lake is really something,” Blanton said.

November’s fall colors are on display near the Visitor’s Center at the Table Rock State Park near Pickens, S.C., as Table Rock looms large in the background.
(Photo by Michael Banks)

Table Rock State Park

Address:158 Ellison Lane, Pickens, SC 29671

Contact: 864-878-9813

https://southcarolinaparks.com/table-rock

Known for:

1. Table Rock. The towering mountain offers up breathtaking views and serves as an access point for hikers on the 80-mile Foothills Trail.

2. Bluegrass music. The “Music on the Mountain” program takes place from 2 to 6 p.m. the second Saturday of each month.

Insider tips:

There’s something special about hiking three miles to the top of Table Rock and seeing a full moon disappear and watching the sun rise, says Scott Stegenga, interpretive ranger at the park for the past 29 years.

“To take in the transition from night to dawn is pretty special. It’s a long hike, but it’s worth it once you get up there. To sit and take in all the surrounding wilderness, watch the sky change, hear the birds awake, to witness the breaking of a new day. It’s just an exhilarating time.”

There is a $25 per person fee and those interested should call the park to register. The next hikes will be Sept. 22 and Oct. 19.

Autumn is a perfect time to visit, Stegenga says.

“You get the foliage peaking at the end of October. The air is cleaner and crisper, less humid. Altogether, it’s a better hiker-friendly atmosphere in the fall. It’s one of the special places in South Carolina that’s still preserved.”

From the overlook atop Caesers Head State Park near Cleveland, S.C., one can see portions of neighboring North Carolina and Georgia.
(Photo courtesy of South Carolina State Parks)

Caesers Head State Park

Address: 8155 Geer Highway, Cleveland, SC 29635

Contact: 864-836-6115

https://southcarolinaparks.com/caesars-head

Known for:

1. Bird-watching, specifically hawks from September through November. During Hawk Watch, visitors can observe the raptors as they migrate to their South American feeding grounds. On one past September day, 11,048 birds passed through the park.

2. Sixty-plus miles of challenging hiking trails and trailside camping. Hike the Raven Cliff Falls Trail and see the tallest waterfall in the state.

Insider tips:

Tim Lee has spent the past 19 years working as the interpretive ranger for the Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area, 13,000 acres of pristine southern mountain forest encompassing both the Caesers Head and Jones Gap state parks.

He has seen a lot of visitors and one of his favorite quotes was from a child as she stood atop the overlook at Caesers Head, which sits some 3,200 feet above sea level with a spectacular view that extends into North Carolina and Georgia.

“She said, ‘You can see the whole world from here.’ And I think that’s a great quote,” Lee said. “Through all our different eyes, you can see the whole world from there.”

And if visitors will look down at the ground, they’ll also be in for a treat.

“One of the things that people don’t think a lot about, but there are a lot of beautiful fall wildflowers that bloom along our trails,” said Lee, mentioning New England asters, various goldenrod species and the beautiful but toxic milk sick, which is also known as white snake root.

A portion of the Middle Saluda River runs through the Jones Gap State Park near Marietta, S.C. Some of the best trout fishing in the state can be found in its waters.
(Photo courtesy of South Carolina State Parks)

Jones Gap State Park

Address: 303 Jones Gap Road, Marietta, SC 29661

Contact: 864-836-3647

https://southcarolinaparks.com/jones-gap

Known for:

1. Beautiful waterfalls. At least five waterfalls can be viewed from this state park. Hikers can work up a sweat on the Rainbow Falls Trail and then cool off in the mist of the falls.

2. The Eastern Continental Divide. Rain falling on one side of this divide runs into streams that eventually end at the Atlantic Ocean, while rain falling on the other side ultimately runs into the Gulf of Mexico. 

Insider tips:

Some of the best fishing for wild trout in the state can be found on the Middle Saluda River, a designated scenic waterway that runs through the park.

Lee, who is a fishermen himself, said the state stopped stocking the river back in the 1970s and those fishermen seeking wild, natural-born trout come to the park.

“You get a true wilderness experience where you feel that you are the only person out there… it’s just you and the river,” Lee said. “It gives you an opportunity to reconnect with the natural world, the river, the forest. I’ve heard many people say how relaxing and calming the sounds of the river

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